National Housing Relief and Assistance to Help People Impacted by the Coronavirus Epidemic

This list is meant to serve as a starting place; in this dynamic environment, resources are emerging and evolving quickly so we may not have first-hand experience with some of these. As such, please use your best judgment when exploring them. We also welcome you to work directly with one of our financial coaches. Sign up for a session today.

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10/29/20

Is there a rent assistance program in my state? Are there other types of housing-related assistance, such as legal assistance, available?

National Legal Help

No

  • United Way of Anchorage: Call Alaska 211 7am-8pm

Legal Services

State-wide No

LITTLE ROCK

  • Section 8 Eviction protection in place

Legal Services

Yes

Legal Services

LA COUNTY

CITY OF LOS ANGELES

CITY OF SAN DIEGO

EAST BAY AREA

Legal Services

Yes (but closed due to high demand)

Legal Services

No Legal Services

No

Legal Services

MARION COUNTY

FORT BEND (Next Round: 9/21 8am)

Legal Services

No

Legal Services

State-wide: No

JEFFERSON COUNTY

LOUISVILLE / JEFFERSON COUNTY

Legal Services

Yes

New Orleans

Legal Services

Yes: https://ms-ramp.com/

Legal Services

Yes (Aug. 3rd-7th; MUST EMAIL housing@dmh.mo.gov to request an application)

Legal Services

No

Legal Services

  • NEW UPDATE: For Westchester households: Westchester Residential Opportunities provide housing related services like Eviction and Utility Shutoff Prevention, Mortgage Default Prevention, Fair Housing, etc. To learn more please visit their website: https://wroinc.org/
  • Yes, https://hcr.ny.gov/RRP
    Applications are open through July 30
  • Visit here for more info on Housing Resources.

Legal Services

Utility Assistance

  • Yes. Through N.C. Housing Opportunities and Prevention of Evictions (HOPE) Program, eligible low- and moderate-income renters experiencing financial hardship due to COVID-19 can apply for rent and utility assistance. You can apply online through the website below or call 2-1-1 Monday through Friday from 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM. https://nc211.org/hope/
  • List of RAP’s https://www.nc211.org/rent-payment-help
ORANGE COUNTY Legal Services

Legal Services

CITY OF CLEVELAND AND CUYAHOGA COUNTY

FRANKLIN COUNTY
Yes

Legal Services

No

Legal Services

Yes (Distributed by community agencies based on county; list below)

Hillsboro 

Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington County, Oregon and in Clark County, Washington

Legal Services

Legal Services

East Cooper, Charleston, Berkeley Counties:  Legal Services

No

Legal Services

Yes

Legal Services

List of nonprofits that may provide local assistance

AUSTIN/TRAVIS COUNTY

  • Family Support Services website or call 211 or 512-854-9020
  • Catholic Charities of Central Texas—512-651-6100
  • St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church—512-345-8314
  • St. Vincent de Paul, St. Austin’s Catholic Church—512-477-9471
  • Travis County Family Support Services Division—512-267-3245
  • Austin Texas Health and Human Services Department (HHSD)—512-972-5011

COLLIN COUNTY

  • Allen Community Outreach—972-422-1850
  • Assistance Center of Collin County—972-422-1850
  • Salvation Army of Collin County—972-423-8254
  • Frisco Family Services Center—972-335-9495
  • Community Lifeline Center—972-542-0020
  • Anna Christian Community Outreach—214-884-6871
  • Salvation Army Plano—972-423-8254
  • McKinney Housing Authority—972-542-5641
  • Plano Texas Housing Authority—972-423-4928
  • Wylie Community Christian Care Center—972-442-4341

DALLAS/DALLAS COUNTY

  • United Way of Metropolitan Dallas—214-978-0000—info@unitedwaydallas.org
  • American Red Cross | North Texas—512-928-4271
  • Catholic Charities—866-223-7500
  • Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance—972-638-5600
  • Dallas County Health and Human Services—214-819-2000
  • Interfaith Dallas—214-827-7220
  • Dallas Housing Crisis Center—214-828-4244
  • ULGD Urban League of Dallas—214-915-4600
  • Metrocrest Services—972-446-2100
  • Garland Housing Authority—972-205-3393
  • City of Garland Neighborhood Development—972-205-3310
  • City of Grand Prairie Department of Housing & Neighborhood Services—972-237-8040
  • Housing Crisis Center—214-828-4244
  • Lancaster Housing Assistance Program—972-275-1750
  • Mesquite Housing Assistance Program—972-216-6424
  • North Dallas Shared Ministries—214-358-8700
  • White Rock Center of Hope—214-324-8996
  • Irving Cares—972-721-9181
  • West Dallas Multipurpose Center—214-670-6530
  • Movement Ministries—260-693-7283
  • Irving Community Service Center—972-251-4054
  • Salvation Army of Dallas County and Irving—972-721-9503
  • Jewish Family Services of Greater Dallas—972-437-9950
  • Duncanville Outreach Ministry—972-296-4986
  • Salvation Army Corps of Garland Texas—972-272-4531
  • Christian Community Action—972-221-1224
  • Salvation Army Plano Service Center—972-423-8254
  • Mesquite Social Services—972-285-3000
  • Richardson East Care Corps—972-231-8231

DENTON COUNTY

  • The Salvation Army Denton Corps—940-566-3800
  • Giving HOPE Inc. —940-382-0609
  • Denton Housing Authority—940-383-1504
  • Catholic Charities—817-413-3921
  • Christian Community Action Lewisville—972-436-4357
  • Helpnet of the Greater Denton Area—940-382-1913
  • Pilot Point Goodfellows—940-686-3014
  • Denton County Friends of the Family—940-387-5131

HOUSTON/HARRIS COUNTY

  • Alliance of Community Assistance Ministries (Includes Service Area Map of Houston Region) The Archdiocese of
  • Galveston-Houston—719-659-5461
  • Catholic Charities—713-874-6776
  • Chinese Community Center—713-271-6100
  • Coalition for the Homeless—713-739-7514
  • Disaster Housing Assistance Program—866-497-6036
  • East Fort Bend Human Needs Ministry—281-261-1006
  • Epiphany Community Health Outreach Services—713-270-0369
  • Emergency Aid Coalition—713-522-5903
  • Humble Area Assistance Ministries—281-446-3663
  • Interfaith Caring Ministries—281-332-3881
  • Jewish Federation of Greater Houston—713-667-9336
  • Katy Christian Ministries—281-391-5261
  • Memorial Area Assistance Ministries—713-468-4516
  • My Brother’s Keeper—281-498-9933
  • Red Cross—713-526-8300
  • St. Vincent’s House—409-763-8521
  • Wesley Community Center—713-223-8131
  • United Way—713-957-4357
  • US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)—713-718-3199
  • West Houston Assistance Ministries—713-977-9942

SAN ANTONIO/BEXAR COUNTY

  • San Antonio Risk Mitigation Fund—210-207-7830
  • Bexar County Community Resources—210-335-3666
  • Alamo Area Resource Center—210-358-9995
  • Catholic Charities – Crisis Intervention Program (utilities only)—210-226-6171
  • Christian Assistance Ministry (CAM) —210-223-4099
  • Ella Austin Community Center—210-224-2351
  • Salvation Army – Social Services—210-352-2020
  • San Antonio AIDS Foundation—210-225-4715
  • SAMMinistries—210-340-0302
  • St. PJ’s Children’s Home (must have disability)—210-531-8555
  • St. Vincent de Paul—210-225-7837

Legal Services

Legal Services
  • Yes: https://dmz1.dhcd.virginia.gov/RMRPEligibility/
  • People Inc. Rental Assistance
    Counties: Buchanan, Bristol City, Clarke, Culpeper, Dickenson, Fauquier, Frederick, Manassas City, Manassas Park City, Page, Prince William, Rappahannock, Russell, Shenandoah, Warren, and Washington
    Call hotline at 1-833-437-0114.

Loudoun County

Henrico County

Legal Services

No

Legal Services

Yes (WEHAP; cannot receive Public Assistance)

Legal Services

Evictions by State:

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The Governor had suspended enforcement of eviction orders for nonpayment of rent, but that order lapsed on June 1. Alabama also suspended in-person civil cases throughout the state, which should have applied to evictions and foreclosures, although it did allow remote proceedings. In person proceedings resumed on May 15. Cities/counties in the state have shied away from explicitly addressing evictions. However, several utility companies have announced that they will not suspend services to customers during the crisis in Birmingham, Decatur, Mobile, and Piedmont.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

On March 20, the Governor issued an executive order that suspends evictions for tenants who receive rental assistance through the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation. On April 10, the legislature passed a bill that suspends any statute that would give a cause of action for evictions or foreclosures, but only as applied to tenants or mortgagees experiencing financial hardship due to COVID-19. The legislation also suspended utility disconnection due to COVID-19 hardship and provided homeless prevention funding. On April 3, the State Supreme Court placed a moratorium on all non-emergency cases. On April 24, the Court began holding remote eviction hearings in cases not covered under the legislature’s prohibition or the CARES Act moratorium. On June 1, the Supreme Court’s moratorium on in-person proceedings ended and the legislature’s prohibition on evictions resulting from COVID-19 financial hardship has expired. Some localities have suspended utility and water shutoffs.

COVID-19 Eviction Enforcement Suspended

The Governor has issued a stay on executing all evictions statewide for tenants who can show (1) that they have suffered a substantial loss of income due to COVID-19, (2) that they or a family member have been ordered to stay in quarantine by a medical professional, or (3) that they have a health condition that makes them more at risk to COVID-19. Evictions proceedings are managed by each Superior Court at the local level. So while eviction actions can’t be executed, they can still be filed and managed in court. Statutory deadlines for courts to hold eviction proceedings are tolled from 3/18-9/30, and that time will not be counted in computing the deadline once the tolling period ends. Mohave County Court has allowed judges to delay eviction cases if needed. In Phoenix, all city-owned housing is prohibited from evicting tenants.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

As of May 18, eviction proceedings may proceed in-person or remotely at the discretion of the presiding judge. However, plaintiffs must certify that the property at issue is not covered by the CARES Act moratorium. The Arkansas Public Service Commission will stop all utility disconnections and waive fees for utility reconnection until the end of public health emergency.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

The Judicial Council of California adopted emergency rules preventing the issuance of summons and the entry of default in all foreclosure and eviction cases, including commercial, unless there is a threat to public health. The rules also postpone trials for at least 60 days. The Governor has issued an executive order banning the enforcement of eviction orders, and tolling response time for new eviction complaints, for renters affected by COVID-19 through May 31, 2020. This order still allows for local governments to pass their own stricter eviction bans. The Governor issued an order giving local governments authority to halt evictions, slow foreclosures, and protect against utility shutoffs until September 30, 2020. Since then several local governments have adopted coronavirus-specific eviction restrictions. Most of these require tenants to provide documentation to verify that they are unable to pay rent due to financial impacts related to COVID-19. Many county superior courts are tolling deadlines via emergency order.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

Gov. Polis’s current executive order requires that landlords must provide tenants with thirty (30) days’ notice of any default for non-payment before initiating or filing action for forcible entry and detainer. The order also prohibits late fees in all cases and requests that landlords implement the model repayment plan created by the Dept. of Local Affairs. The state has established a low-income rental assistance program for households impacted by COVID-19, and has devoted funding to direct housing assistance and legal representation. Nearly all judicial districts and several counties have issued orders continuing most civil matters or ordering them to be done via teleconference. Finally, several utilities providers in Colorado have suspended shutoffs; several towns and cities have asked providers to do the same or else said that they will not disconnect service.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

Per the Governor’s order, eviction notices may not be issued to any tenant until August 22nd. Upon request, tenants that are able to show they were economically impacted by COVID-19 can have their landlord apply their security deposit to April, May, June, July, or August’s rent. Tenants have a 60-day grace period to pay April rent, and may request an additional 60-day grace period for May rent if they are facing financial hardship due to COVID-19. The Chief Administrative Judge for Civil Matters has announced that execution of evictions is stayed through August 1, and foreclosure sales scheduled for March-May will take place in July. Further, during the time period when only Priority One cases are being heard by the court, all civil trials are suspended. The Governor has also suspended all statutory deadlines relating to the issuance of civil judgments. There is a 30-day utility shutoff moratorium in place as of March 13 and subject to renewal. The Governor announced on 3/31/20 that the state had reached a deal with over 50 credit unions and banks to delay mortgage payments for 90 days.

Eviction Enforcement Suspended

On March 24th, Governor John Carney issued a comprehensive executive order establishing moratoriums for evictions, foreclosures, and utility shutoffs during the duration of the Covid-19 crisis. The order prevented new filings, tolled deadlines in pending cases until 31 days after the emergency ends, prevented execution of issued judgments, and prohibited landlords from charging late fees. It also prevented new foreclosure actions, tolls deadlines in ongoing foreclosure cases, and prevented sheriff sales and the execution of writs of possession until 31 days after the emergency ends. The Justice of the Peace Court has also ordered that all landlord/tenant cases and ordered/scheduled evictions between March 17 and April 16 be delayed until after May 1, with exceptions for “landlord-tenant matters involving essential services and/or harm to persons or property.” On June 30, Governor John Carney issued an executive order peeling away the protections against evictions from his earlier orders. This order allows for the filings of new evictions. These actions, as well as previously filed actions, shall be stayed to determine if ADR or mediation would be appropriate. Tenants shall not be evicted during the declared emergency unless the court deems it necessary in the interest of justice. Tenants shall not be charged late fees from the state of emergency. Foreclosures may also be filed, and any deadlines that had been stayed are now lifted unless the court orders otherwise. Residents shall not be ejected during the emergency unless a judgment was entered in the foreclosure case prior to the start of the COVID-19 emergency. Actions filed should include supporting documents, as directed by the court and supplied by the landlord, that demonstrate that the subject property is not covered by the CARES Act. All utilities in Delaware should provide 4-month payment plans to households affected by COVID-19 that can demonstrate they suffered some impact by the least amount of proof necessary.

COVID-19 Hardship Eviction Cases Suspended

On April 2, Governor DeSantis suspended statutes giving a cause of action for eviction related to COVID19 and foreclosure for 45 days. On May 14 the order was extended to June 2, on June 1 it was extended to July 1, and on June 30 it was extended to July 31. The Florida Supreme Court suspended the requirement for the clerk to issue writs of possession “forthwith” until July 2. The Governor announced a $250 million housing assistance program, which provides $120 million to the state housing authorities, and $120 million to counties to assist renters.

Local Discretion

Georgia’s Supreme Court has issued guidance that courts are to prioritize essential functions from March 14, 2020 to April 13th, 2020 and conduct video proceedings wherever possible. Each circuit, municipal and magistrate court had a slightly different version and date range for adopting this ruling

Civil Cases & Eviction Enforcement Suspended

The governor has issued an order suspending laws that allow for terminating tenancies and filing/prosecuting eviction actions for nonpayment of rent. The Hawaii Department of Public Safety Sheriff Division is suspending all eviction activities. Hawaii’s Chief Justice issued an order presumptively suspending all civil hearings, including landlord-tenant matters, until after April 30. Most circuits have issued orders postponing all civil matters or in-person conferences “[e]xcept for civil proceedings deemed urgent by the presiding judge.” The governor’s office and the Public Utilities Commission are working with utility companies. Honolulu’s Board of Water Supply will not shut off water service. And several utilities companies have announced that they will not shut off service due to nonpayment.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

Idaho had a statewide order directing that eviction cases be continued except for emergencies. However, on April 22nd, the Supreme Court issued an order resuming all hearings remotely, effective May 1st. Some counties have moved to reduced operations in the court system and are hearing a limited number of cases that don’t include eviction cases. 3 private companies have promised to suspend utility shutoffs.

Eviction Enforcement Suspended

The Governor of Illinois issued an “order ceasing evictions” that stated: “all state, county and local law enforcement officers in the State of Illinois are instructed to cease enforcement of orders of eviction for residential premises for the duration of the Gubernatorial Disaster Proclamation.” The order also stated that “a person or entity may not commence a residential eviction action.” This order has been extended through 7/26. The State Supreme Court has directed lower courts to keep fulfilling essential functions, but to delay or schedule remote hearings for non-essential matters. Local courts may also suspend deadlines. The State Supreme Court has ruled that plaintiffs in all residential actions must file an affidavit certifying that the property at issue is not covered under the CARES Act. The state has funded a rental and mortgage assistance program for residents struggling to make payments as a result of COVID-19. Additional funding has also been provided to the state’s low income energy assistance program (LIHEAP). A moratorium on utility disconnections is in place until 8/1.

Eviction Cases Suspended

In May, the Governor issued an executive order lifting the prohibition against emergency eviction and foreclosure actions as of May 22, and all evictions as of July 1. The Supreme Court of Indiana issued clarifying guidance in March that filings are still being accepted, and urging courts to consider public health, safety, and property values when using their discretion to decide whether to stay non-emergency proceedings. On 7/13, households can begin applying for the state’s rental assistance program, which provides up to $500 payments for four months. Indiana has also placed a statewide moratorium on utility shut-offs and individual companies have announced that they will further suspend shutoffs. On 6/31, the Governor issued an executive order that extended the moratorium of evictions and foreclosures for non-payment until July 31. Notwithstanding the moratorium, a landlord may institute an emergency eviction or possessory claim where there is specific immediate and serious injury, or loss or damage to the property. Moreover, a lending institution is no longer prohibited from instituting a foreclosure action where the property is vacant or abandoned, or where there is a specific immediate and serious injury, or there is loss or damage to the property.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

Governor Kim Reynolds issued three orders suspending statutory provisions that allow plaintiffs to bring eviction and foreclosure actions for the duration of the public health proclamation; these orders expired on May 27th. The state Supreme Court has directed that forcible entry and detainer proceedings should either be continued to a date after June 15th, or conducted by phone at a local court’s discretion. Utilities are not allowed to be shut off under state order until the public health emergency is lifted by the Governor. On May 29, the state announced a statewide rent and mortgage relief program.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

Courts in Kansas are completing only essential functions in person, which do not appear to include evictions and foreclosures. As of 05/01, deadlines for judicial proceedings were suspended, but judges may issue orders in individual cases, including eviction cases, setting deadlines for cases to move forward. Before its expiration on May 31, Governor Kelly’s executive order declared that eviction and foreclosure proceedings could not be brought as a result of nonpayment due to financial hardship related to COVID-19.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

Governor Andy Beshear has stated that evictions are suspended, and has directed state law enforcement officers not to enforce eviction orders for residential premises for the duration of the statewide emergency. Under the State Supreme Court’s order, except for emergency and statutorily required proceedings, evictions are continued and new evictions cannot be filed until 30 days after the expiration of the order. The state’s Public Service Commission announced on March 16, that it would order all utilities under its jurisdiction to stop shut-offs for non-payments and late payments for at least thirty days.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The Governor’s Executive Order suspends deadlines in all legal proceedings in all courts until June 15, 2020.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

Maine’s Judicial Branch ordered from March 18, 2020 through May 30, 2020, all evictions and foreclosures are suspended; the Supreme Court has also ordered that previously scheduled cases will not be heard and new cases will not be scheduled for a hearing until August 3, 2020 at the earliest as part of the Judicial Branch’s phased reopening plan. Governor Mills issued an order prohibiting writs of restitution from being executed except in cases of imminent risk of harm or criminal activity, and extending the time by which a notice has to be given to terminate a tenancy at will. The state has also issued a statewide moratorium on utility shutoffs.

COVID-19 Hardship Eviction Cases Suspended

The governor passed an eviction moratorium stating that evictions should not issue if the tenant is subject to financial hardship due to COVID-19. This order lasts the duration of the state of emergency. The State Supreme Court rescinded its moratorium on residential evictions and foreclosures, and courts will begin hearing these matters 7/25. The court also announced that all parties seeking foreclosures, as well as new and pending evictions, must file a Declaration of Compliance with the CARES Act. On 6/26, the Governor announced a rental assistance program with funding both for assisted housing relief, and for eviction rental support to local governments.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

The Massachusetts legislature passed, and the governor signed, a model COVID-19 eviction moratorium on April 17, 2020. The emergency legislation will be in effect until 45 days after the governor’s emergency declaration ends, or for 120 days, whichever is sooner. It freezes all five stages of evictions, applies to commercial, residential real estate and foreclosure. Landlords would be prohibited from terminating a tenancy and giving tenants a notice to quit. In addition, landlords and mortgagors are prohibited from issuing late fees and reporting to credit agencies where a nonpayment is due to COVID-19 financial hardship. Currently, the State-Level housing court order suspends eviction and/or foreclosure cases, will not accept most filings, and prevents new judgments from being issued until May 4. Deadlines are also tolled until that date.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

On 6/26, the Governor passed EO 2020-134 extending the state’s eviction moratorium to 7/15. The moratorium ended on 7/16. Now the Eviction Diversion Program launches, awarding payments to landlords who agree not to evict tenants for housing debt accrued during COVID-19. Landlords must agree to waive late fees, and forgive up to 10% of the amount due. Households up to 100% of the state’s median income are eligible for the program. Michigan’s courts may still hear existing civil cases remotely or in-person if they have complied with the phased reopening plan created by the State Court Administrative Office. Court deadlines and deadlines to commence civil actions are tolled until 7/31. Property owners must submit verification that the property is exempt from the federal CARES Act moratorium.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

On March 23, Governor Walz issued Emergency Executive Order 20-14 suspending eviction filings and executions beginning March 24 at 5:00 p.m., except for emergency endangerment cases, and through the duration of the state of emergency. The order also prohibits foreclosure filings where there is COVID-19 financial hardship. On March 24, the Chief Justice amended the March 20 order to conform to the executive order. The Chief Justice initially suspended all non-high priority district court proceedings through 3/30. On May 1, the court resumed hearing cases, including evictions, remotely. Beginning August 4th, evictions where tenants seriously endanger the safety of other residents or materially violate a residential lease on the premises by seriosuly endangering the safety of others/significantly damages property can resume.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The State Supreme Court has directed local courts to determine their own court operations, although it has urged them to limit in-person proceedings. Most courts are still operating, and none clearly limit evictions. Hancock and DeSoto Justice Courts order that eviction proceedings continue to take place. Before its expiration on May 31, the Governor’s executive order suspended all residential evictions, including single family homes, hotels, rental units, shelters, mobile home parks, and similar facilities used as an individual’s principal dwelling.

Local Discretion

The Supreme Court has issued an operational directive related to reopening the courts to the public. A statewide order had suspended all in-person proceedings, but allowed eviction and foreclosure cases to proceed remotely. Several judicial circuits have issued their own orders postponing eviction cases and directing that they be rescheduled.

COVID-19 Hardship Eviction Cases Suspended

As of May 24, the Governor’s executive order expired for almost all Montanans, but members of a vulnerable population who continue to shelter in place are still protected by it if they inform their landlord they are members of a vulnerable population, are sheltering in place, and have had a negative financial impact from COVID-19. If considered a vulnerable person, then the Governor’s directive will not expire until the earliest of these dates: 30 days after a person stops sheltering at home, or the end of the Covid-19 emergency. All others not protected by Governor’s directive may be evicted and/or have utilities disconnected.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The Governor’s Executive Order that temporarily suspended residential evictions expired on May 31, 2020. There is currently no statewide order in place that suspends evictions now. Courts at the District and County levels determine whether to hear civil proceedings, including eviction proceedings.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

The Governor signed an Executive Order on 6/25 detailing a plan to protect tenants while phasing in eviction proceedings. Residential summary eviction proceedings for non-payment/no cause and foreclosures will remain suspended until 9/1, and late fees for non-payment cannot be charged retroactively. Other residential evictions can resume 8/1. Further, residential tenants can be evicted on 8/1 if the process started prior to 3/30. Commercial evictions can begin starting 7/1. Governor is encouraging landlords to work out payment plans with tenants, and has announced a rental assistance plan to support tenants and ensure landlords receive delinquent rents.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

The Governor’s moratorium on eviction and foreclosure proceedings expired on 7/1. The order suspending utility disconnections and late fees is extended until 7/15, and the Governor issued an order requiring utilities providers to work out payment arrangements extending at least 6 months to help customers pay bills accrued during the emergency suspension. The Governor authorized a housing assistance program (GOFERR) that provides both one-time grants and short-term housing assistance for households struggle to secure or maintain housing as a result of COVID-19. New Hampshire Supreme Court’s moratorium on eviction hearing expired. Courts have resumed eviction proceedings and parties must submit a CARES Act affidavit to file for an eviction.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

Governor Phil Murphy signed an Executive Order on 3/19 that halts the removal of residents pursuant to evictions or foreclosure proceedings for two months after the end of the emergency. On 7/2 Governor Murphy signed an Executive Order extending the statewide Public Health Emergency with no expiration date. Therefore the state’s Eviction Moratorium is, in effect, extended with no expiration date. On 6/25, the State Supreme Court confirmed that the suspension of residential lockouts remains in effect, although landlord/tenant complaints can still be filed with the courts, and settlement conferences can be held. The state has enacted a temporary rental assistance program for low-income households impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Utilities companies have agreed to halt disconnections for the length of the crisis, and the Governor passed legislation empowering local authorities to waive interest and lien enforcement for delinquent water and sewer utility payments and suspend utility disconnections during public health emergencies.

Nonpayment Eviction Cases Suspended

The New Mexico Supreme Court has stayed the execution of writs of restitution for nonpayment of rent under NMSA 1978, Section 47-8-46 (A) if the resident has demonstrated by a preponderance of the evidence a current inability to pay rent. The New Mexico Supreme Court has also stayed the execution of writs of restitution for mobile homes. Landlords can still file for eviction, and courts can still hear eviction cases remotely or in person. Without additional measures, evictions enforcement will proceed when the court’s order is lifted. New Mexico Public Regulation Commission ordered suspension of discontinuation residential customer utility service during public health emergency.

COVID-19 Hardship Eviction Cases Suspended

On 6/30, the Governor signed the Tenant Safe Harbor Act, which suspends evictions for tenants who can show they have suffered financial hardship during the COVID-19 emergency period (includes rental debt accrued during the eviction moratorium) until all COVID-19 restrictions on gatherings and non-essential businesses are lifted. The Governor’s Executive Order prohibits initiation of and enforcement of eviction for non-payment if a tenant has experienced COVID-19 hardship, or is receiving unemployment benefits, for a period of 60 days beginning on June 20. The Governor’s order also provides that landlords are prohibited from charging late fees from March 20, 2020, through August 20, 2020 and allows tenants to put their security deposits toward rent. The legislature has also enacted a measure that requires mortgage providers to offer mortgage forebearance for up to 180 days to mortgage holders, to refrain from charging late fees, and to not report late payments to credit reporting agencies.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The Supreme Court of North Carolina has resumed ejectment and foreclosure actions as of June 21, and sheriffs are not required to execute pending writs until June 30. The Supreme Court also gave defendants 30 days to appear after a summons for a summary ejectment or small claims eviction is issued, prohibited courts from issuing a writ of possession in a summary ejectment proceeding without CARES Act certification, and created a mediation program for summary ejectment proceedings. The Governor’s executive order prohibiting evictions for nonpayment of rent expired on June 21, but the order granted tenants 6 months from the expiration of the order to pay back any rent that accrued while the order was in effect. Utility shut offs are prohibited through July 29.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

On April 24, the North Dakota Supreme Court amended its order suspending all residential eviction proceedings to allow evictions to resume remotely. The Court has extended the deadline to hold a hearing from 15 to 45 days. The state emergency commission also approved funding for a short-term rent support program to help households who lost income due to COVID-19.

Local Discretion

Ohio does not have a statewide moratorium on evictions. The Supreme Court of Ohio tolled all court deadlines until the earlier of the end of the emergency or 7/30/20, but the determination of how to restrict access to the court is left to local jurisdictions. Several municipal courts have ordered the suspension of evictions. The Governor issued an emergency order “requesting” that landlords of commercial properties suspend rent payments and evictions and that lenders provide mortgage forbearance.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

Most evictions have now resumed in Oklahoma since the state Supreme Court allowed non-jury hearings to proceed on 5/16. The plaintiff in any action for eviction filed after 3/27 must affirmatively plead that the property subject to eviction is not covered under the CARES Act. The Governor also announced an eviction mitigation program that reimburses local organizations that provide rent relief to tenants, up to $3600 for each individual mitigation.

Eviction Cases & Nonpayment Eviction Enforcement Suspended

Before the Governor’s eviction moratorium expired on 6/30, the legislature passed two bills which suspend both foreclosures (HB4204) and residential and commercial evictions for non-payment/no cause (HB4213) until 9/30. The eviction moratorium also institutes a six-month grace period to pay back rent (until 3/31/21) accrued during the moratorium period. The state has also allocated funding for rent relief through local organizations. Anyone who makes up to 50% of the median state income is elligible, with priority going to those impacted by COVID-19.

Nonpayment Eviction Cases Suspended

Governor issued an executive order today extending the PA statewide eviction and foreclosure moratorium (nonpayment and overstayed leases only) until August 31, 2020. All eviction and foreclosure actions must be computed with a start date of August 31, 2020. The state of emergency ordered by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ended 6/1, but local courts have the power to declare local emergencies. On 6/29, the Governor announced a rental assistance program for tenants who lost up to 30% of their income or became unemployed. The program offers up to $750/month for 6 months.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

The Rhode Island Supreme Court has issued an order stating that evictions will be scheduled as of June 2. Filing of new eviction cases, which had been suspended since March 17, may also resume on June 2. When filing eviction cases, Plaintiffs must affirm that the property is not covered by the federal CARES Act moratorium. The state’s Public Utilities Commission has issued a moratorium on utility shutoffs for low-income customers until April 15, 2021. The state has also announced a program to provide rent relief to eligible applicants.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

The Supreme Court of South Carolina issued an order that all evictions will resume on 5/15/20. CARES act certifications for eviction and foreclosure actions must be filed either with initial case filings or, for continuing actions, before the action proceeds once the Supreme Court’s moratorium ends. The state has allocated funding to support rent relief through SC Thrive. Residents with an income at or below 80% of the median income, who can demonstrate COVID-19 hardship, are eligible for a one-time payment up to $1500.

Local Discretion

The Supreme Court of the State of South Dakota declared a judicial emergency and authorized circuit courts to adopt, modify or suspend court rules to prevent the spread of COVID-19. None of the circuit court orders suspend evictions or civil proceedings generally. The Governor has explicitly stated that she will not consider an eviction or utility shutoff moratorium. One of South Dakota’s largest utilities provider has implemented a moratorium on service disconnections for nonpayment.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

Eviction actions may proceed as of 6/1 according to the Supreme Court of Tennessee if the party seeking eviction files a declaration that the property is not covered by the CARES Act no later than 10 days prior to any hearing. The Supreme Court continues to encourage remote hearings. Local courts have issued additional orders and the Davidson County’s Sheriff suspended all evictions, foreclosures, and utility shutoffs until further notice.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The Texas Supreme Court’s most recent order states that eviction proceedings may resume on 5/19; written warnings may be posted and writs may be issued starting on 5/26. Landlords must certify that properties are not subject to CARES Act. The Texas Public Utility Commission is offering a program called the COVID-19 Electricity Relief Program which suspend disconnections for residential customers who have been added to the state’s unemployment and low income list due to the effects of COVID-19 until August 31, 2020.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

The Governor let the emergency eviction moratorium passed 3/31 expire on 5/15. The Utah Supreme Court activated the Pandemic Response Plan and allowed local courts to implement their own district pandemic response plans. District courts are instructed to prioritize mission critical functions, which do not include eviction hearings. The state has passed relief measures to provide rental assistance for residential tenants who are not receiving unemployment, as well as commercial renters. Applicants for rental assistance receive benefits scaled according to the percent of their COVID income reduction.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

The Supreme Court of Vermont had suspended all non-emergency civil cases, at the discretion of the judge, but ordered hearings resume on June 1. State lawmakers passed and the governor signed on May 14 emergency legislation that stays evictions cases, orders and executions until 30 days after the Governor declares an end to the state of emergency. The Governor has extended the State of Emergency until August 15th which means the Eviction Moratorium in place by the Vermont State legislature is also extended. To prevent a surge of evictions when the moratorium ends, the legislature passed rental and foreclosure assistance relief and has passed funding to combat homelessness during the pandemic.

COVID-19 Hardship Eviction Cases Suspended

The Governor’s eviction moratorium expired on 6/28 with the passage of a $50 million rent and foreclosure relief program (RMRP). Legislation is in place that grants a 60-day continuance of an eviction action if a tenant can prove they were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and a 30-day continuance of a foreclosure action if the homeowner can prove they were affected by the pandemic. The continuance period is tolled for the period of any state judicial emergency. During the crisis period, electricity, natural gas, water and sewer utilities regulated by the State Corporation Commission must suspend service disconnections and charge no late fees or reconnection charges because of COVID-19 issues through 8/31.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

The Governor of Washington issued a temporary moratorium on residential evictions and prohibited law enforcement from enforcing past orders of eviction until August 1, 2020. The order also forbids assessing late fees or raising rent during this period. It further requires landlords to offer reasonable repayment plans when non-payment was a result of Covid-19 related hardship. Cases in which the landlord/owner can show that eviction is necessary for health or safety or where the landlord seeks to sell or personally occupy the property are excepted. The city of Seattle has also extended the right to a repayment plan, a moratorium on late fees, and established the inability to pay rent as a defense to eviction for 6 months after the civil emergency expires.

Eviction Cases & Enforcement Suspended

The D.C. Council passed emergency legislation prohibiting filing and execution of evictions, foreclosures, and late fees during the time period for which the Mayor has declared a public health emergency. The legislation also prohibits utility shutoffs and requires a COVID-19 hardship alert on any consumer report. If a property has 5 or more units, property owners must offer tenants a payment plan program for past due rent and cannot report any tenant participating in the program to collections. The mayor passed a rental assistance program to provide support to tenants who can show proof of rent delinquency.

Eviction Cases can Resume (Remote or In-Person)

The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals issued an order staying all trials, proceedings, statutes of limitations and other court deadlines for non-emergency actions between March 22 and May 15. Courts resumed in person proceedings on May 18. No subsequent protections have been passed.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

As of 5/26 the Governor’s moratorium on evictions and foreclosures for non-payment expired. Courts can conduct eviction proceedings remotely, and in June, evictions were up 40% compared to last year. Wisconsin has passed a Rental Assistance Program that provides eligible applicants may receive up to $3000. The Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection, created an emergency rule that landlords cannot charge late fees or penalties during COVID-19, however a legislative committee voted to block the rule. The Supreme Court explicitly declined to adopt a CARES Act pleading requirement. According to the the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin, all regulated utilities must suspend utility disconnection and suspend late fees until July 25.

Evictions Can Resume (Remote)

Judges can conduct eviction hearings remotely. The legislature has allocated funding for rental relief measures that provide assistance for those struggling to pay rent due to COVID-19 financial hardship. Utilities disconnections may be suspended throughout the length of the emergency but the state has not ordered this.